As we discussed in one of our recent posts, Blick Art Materials, LLC is just one of the latest companies that has come face-to-face with the importance of ADA compliance and the consequences of not providing reasonable accommodations for the public.

The U.S. District Course for the Eastern District of New York has already issued a decision stating that the site is considered a “place of public accommodation” under the Americans with Disabilities Act. Such a decision, and several recent decisions or opinions in the same line of thinking, seem to show a trend toward more stringent definitions and enforcement of ADA compliance requirements on the web. Other recent findings in similar cases include Hobby Lobby and Five Guys Burgers – both large companies. As such, it is not just small businesses or public agencies that are being held to this standard, and we are beginning to see real enforcement of compliance requirements.

While cases like these continue to be heard in courts across the country, it is critical that businesses both large and small, as well as public agencies and other organizations, closely examine their sites and the ADA requirements to ensure that they are meeting or exceeding the needs of all current and prospective site users. Ensuring such compliance is the only sure way to provide a better level of service for the public while avoiding costly and lengthy lawsuits.